Electron microscope slow-motion video of vinyl LP

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Sean G, Jul 3, 2016.

  1. Sean G

    Sean G Well-Known Member

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    Jul 27, 2015
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    Ever wondered what those grooves really looked like up close on your vinyl LPs'?...


     
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  2. DonnyThompson

    DonnyThompson Distinguished Member

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    Thanks for sharing this Sean, it's a cool vid. :)

    This guy has some cool toys... I like how he mentioned how his "Sputter Coater wasn't working right", he was so causal and matter-a-fact about it, like this is something that everyone has laying around the house, as if it was a coffee maker, or a toaster that needed repaired. LOL...

    When he said that, I laughed and thought to myself, "yeah, those damn sputter coaters can be so temperamental ... I really need to get mine fixed, too.".. LOL
     
  3. Sean G

    Sean G Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2015
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    Sydney, Australia
    It just turned up randomly in my youtube feed, maybe because I was searching last week on vinyl lathes.
    I found it really interesting so I thought I would share it...who would have thought those tiny grooves would look the way they do, and I liked the way he explained how the L & R channels work between the stylus and the groove...something I wasn't aware of before this vid.

    That reminds me Donny, I need to get my sputter coater looked at as well...its spitting as opposed to sputtering;)
     
  4. Boswell

    Boswell Moderator Distinguished Member

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    You can consider a stereo record groove as being M-S encoded, ostensibly for mono compatibility. Stereo FM radio has a similar encoding method, but the M channel is in the audio band and the S channel is modulated on to a sub-carrier sitting above upper limit of the M channel bandwidth.

    In the stereo LP record groove, the vertical stylus component is the S information and the lateral (side-to-side) component is the M information. A stereo cartridge does the job of decoding this mechanically to an L-R signal by using coils mounted at 45 degrees either side of vertical. It was good to see the tracking process in action in the video.
     
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  5. audiokid

    audiokid Chris Staff

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    Thanks for sharing that Bos. (y)

    And Sean as well. (y)

    Here is more interesting stuff. http://recording.org/threads/vinyl-records-and-analog-remasters-coming-back.53163/
     

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