Intel® Pentium® M Processor

Discussion in 'Computing' started by pandamonkey, Nov 16, 2003.

  1. pandamonkey

    pandamonkey Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2001
    Ok, could someone please explain the "Pentium M" Processor? Is this the same as P4 etc? How is the Pentium M Processor in a laptop related to audio and the like?
    Best regards,
    mIchAEl
     
  2. pandamonkey

    pandamonkey Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2001
    Can no one answer my question..... :confused:
    mIchAEl
     
  3. SHINEBOXNJ

    SHINEBOXNJ Guest

    Michael-

    THe Pentium M processor is the Mobile Processor you would find in a lot of laptops. The front side bus is cut down which uses a lot less power making it more ideal for a mobile set up. I think the M processors are at 400Mhz FSB, but I could be wrong. I know the cpu speed is up around 2.6 ghz, possibly more now. I am sure you can get away with doing some audio on an M processor, but you wouldn't be able to get down and dirty. I dont think there is that much of a price difference between a regular P4 and M P4, once again I could be wrong.

    Hope that helps.. a little.

    -Mark
     
  4. pandamonkey

    pandamonkey Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2001
    The above quote means that it demands less on a battery?
    What is the average FSB of a P4 and what aspects of my audio production work would suffer from the M processor reduction?
    What would be a recomended FSB speed for audio on a laptop in relation to price and availability?

    Best regards,
    mIchAEl
     
  5. sserendipity

    sserendipity Member

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2001
    Yes, by reducing it's cpu horsepower when on battery power.

    All of it :>
    The fastest you can afford, and is available. Sorry that I can't be more specific, but it's a real bottle neck on your system's speed.
     
  6. knightfly

    knightfly Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2002
    I recently bought a Toshiba Satellite P4 laptop, which has a 533 mHz FSB - most portables are still at 400 FSB, and desktop procs are up to 800 FSB without overclocking - this determines memory transfer speeds, so is very important for any and allplug-ins etc -

    However, most laptops are further choked by 4500 rpm drives, mine is no exception. This will limit track count in multitrack software. There are aftermarket drives, by Hitachi I think, that are 7200 rpm for laptops. Ive not looked into them yet, but that should speed things up some.

    Hope that helped... Steve
     

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