Question on wireless headsets

Discussion in 'Microphones (live or studio)' started by zan, Dec 8, 2015.

  1. Boswell

    Boswell Moderator Well-Known Member

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    The transmitters in that group of products appear to use only two EU frequencies. What that means is that you could use the dual set but not the single set at the same time, as its frequency clashes with the higher one of the dual set.

    The guitar pickup you linked to is not good - I strongly recommend that you look for a different type. A Fishman under-bridge or a standard detatchable under-string pickup would give better sound quality and be less prone to acoustic booming feedback.
     
  2. DonnyThompson

    DonnyThompson Well-Known Member

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    The Chines made Olympic sleds? LOL... sorry... err, uhmm... as you were.

    :p
     
  3. Sean G

    Sean G Well-Known Member

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    -Sorry...that should have read lounges....lol:ROFLMAO:
     
  4. paulears

    paulears Well-Known Member

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    Ok - there are some good and bad features in this setup. This range of AKG radio equipment is intended for smaller, perhaps semi-pro small bands and duos who work smaller stages, or clubs. The system is based on tried and tested technology. Downside is that they are intended for the European harmonised free channels, and there are 4, (or 5 if you go Sennheiser) channels, tops! Everybody, including maybe the DJ, the swimming instructor and aerobics teacher will be using these channels. You can often survive because the distance between transmitter and receiver is so short. On these, if somebody is already on your channel, you ae stuck, because they are preset as far as I can tell - no channel change being possible. The professional systems use two receivers in one box on the same channel - and these diversity systems then switch between the strongest signal. These AKGs have two receivers tuned to different frequencies, so have two outputs - but you lose the signal protection. Outputs are not on the usual XLRs, but that's not critical. Two receivers in one 19" 1U rack are common professionally - either two racked next to each other, or two in a single housing. One or two manufacturers do a quad system, but we're talking lots more money. A single Sennheiser basic professional system will be 500 Euros, so these are budget products, lots of plastic, but acceptable performance when not pushed too hard. Oddly - those microphones are rather nice - but rather ugly, being based on AKG's proven drum clip ons. (and also sax/brass clip ons).

    They're also not available on the licensed (and different) channels each country allocate differently.

    They are not rubbish, but they're a compromise between performance and price - and price wins. If I left my Sennheiser bass wireless at home by mistake and was offered the load of one of these, I'd use it happily, and just make sure I kept close to the receiver.

    Professional users simply rack up equipment and add aerial distribution so two aerials can feed multiple receivers. Makes for a much neater setup.

    I have 6 channel racks, 4 channel racks and the biggest I use is a 14 channel rack, that has networking and other functions that connect to a Macbook that then shows the rf and audio levels for each receiver, nice little pictures of the user, and lots of information. I on the other hand have a spare system for my bass - a cheapish Line 6 digital which sounds just as good as my Sennheisers. Once you spend 500 euros plus per channel, they have metal boxes, more facilities, better receivers, better sensitivity and selectivity - plenty of range on the input sensitivity to cope with a whisperer or a trumpet, and they have a better resale value, plus of course can work on the ch 38 frequencies we use in the UK, and have enough bandwidth to operate on the additional radio channels authorised on a channel by channel basis by OFCOM in the channels just above 38.

    Radio microphones are never as good as a cable, but can get close. They all suffer from unexpected dropouts, and non-diversity systems are the worst.

    That piezo guitar pickup will be simply dreadful. They sound thin and tinny, and frequently feedback with only moderate volume through the PA.
     
  5. dvdhawk

    dvdhawk Well-Known Member

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    The AKG headset mics are perfectly good for your application, meant for drummers, keyboard players, aerobic instructors, etc. where looks aren't particularly important.

    I share the other guys' concerns regarding the limitations of the WMS40 mini transmitter and receiver. It's a step in the right direction over your original proposal, but might fall short of the goal. If it were my money, I'd keep saving until I could afford at least the Perception series. They would have spatial diversity receivers, have some agility in changing channels if you encounter interference, and allow enough separate frequencies to do 2 headsets and a instrument pack without conflict.
     
  6. zan

    zan Active Member

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    Is that true? Will the dual set clash with the single set?
     
  7. Boswell

    Boswell Moderator Well-Known Member

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    Maybe - it depends how you interpret the AKG data. The dual set uses ISM 2 and 3 in the Ch 70 (860MHz) band, but the single set is shown as fixed ISM 3 in one document but with available frequencies of ISM 1, 2 and 3 in another. In my experience with other radio devices, that indicates that it's not switchable between the frequencies and it may be pot luck which you get. You could try ordering one factory-set to ISM 1.

    Be aware that, even if you could specify a non-conflicting set of frequencies, using these devices limits you to one rig with 3 channels, which could cramp your future style.
     
    pcrecord likes this.
  8. paulears

    paulears Well-Known Member

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    Back in the crystal channeling days, it was common for the manufacturer to supply a dealer with random channels, and a dealer would put together multichannel systems by looking at the box labels, and these products are the modern equivalent. Most purchasers just want one, or two channels - so it's fine. It is very tricky to use more than two channels, and four systems is never twice as tricky as two. In multi-channel systems the calculation of the frequencies is very important, and loads of people with unable systems just pick 3 or 4 at random and expect them to work trouble-free. This rarely happens as there will be what are called 'intermodulation products'. It boils down to maths, and the specifications of the systems - so Sennheiser's intermod free channels won't be the same as Shures, or Audio Technica - and mixing brands puts you into unknown territory. These cheaper systems will just have a set of four frequencies (hopefully), but could actually just be two? At this price point, the spec is not really overburdened with useful data.
     

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