Really Need B&W Monitors for Mastering?

Discussion in 'Monitoring' started by mactreouser, Dec 11, 2016.

  • AT5047

    The New AT5047 Premier Studio Microphone Purity Transformed

  1. mactreouser

    mactreouser Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2014
    Besides room acoustic, do we really need a B&W for Mastering reference? Or... a KRK 2.1 system will do? Perhaps, a Stereo pair does it job?
     
  2. audiokid

    audiokid Chris Staff

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2000
    Location:
    BC, Canada
    Home Page:
    use what works for you.
     
    ChrisH likes this.
  3. mactreouser

    mactreouser Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2014
    Is that means "Use What I Have right now" ?
     
  4. pcrecord

    pcrecord Quality recording seeker ! Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2013
    Location:
    Quebec, Canada
    Home Page:
    Mac, a mastering facility needs top of the line equipment and room acoustics.
    Since we were discussing ADA8200 in another thread, I assume you are far behind the level of expertise and equipement needed to a mastering engineer.
    Correct me if I'm wrong, my point is not to offend you.

    Let's first differentiate what is mixing and what is mastering.
    Mixing is the art of putting many recorded tracks together so we can hear everything and create the song ambiance.
    Mastering is the art of taking all the song of an album, make sure they are to similar levels and the frequency content is alike and also to what the industry is at.
    It's a bit too simplified but in other word the mastering engineer makes shure no one will reach the volume or EQ knob when listening to your album.
    I own my studio since year 1999 and with ear training and better equipement I won't dare ask to be called mastering engineer.

    Ok I get that not everyone have the money to send every demo to a ME.
    I often do what I called a pseudo mastering with a pluggin called Ozone and some from Fabfilter specially the Pro-L
    One day, if by miracle I get a ton of cash, I might buy those 5k monitors, hire a specialist to tune my room and buy the top of the line EQs and Comp etc but even then I may fail to be a good mastering engineer ;)
     
    audiokid likes this.
  5. mactreouser

    mactreouser Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2014
    No worries about that, I got you! In fact, you pointed those points of most of us!
    I'm a 100% self-mastering in the box (software based), for some years... Therefore, wish to do some upgrades (in terms of knowledge, views and even skills...if possible). As a 100% software-guy, I definitely have no idea about hybrid or analogue world, but just wish to swim in and know about it. Hope you don't mind to share some of your precious experiences and knowledges... perhaps one day, by miracle, I get a ton of cash too? hahaha...
     
    pcrecord and audiokid like this.
  6. pcrecord

    pcrecord Quality recording seeker ! Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2013
    Location:
    Quebec, Canada
    Home Page:
    I'm glad we are on the same page. :)

    I found that the more I'm doing it the better I get.. I take my pseudo masters to different places (in my car most of the time) and I find that I'm getting better each time.. Of course, I know my ears are still developping and that's why my results change. I'm sure having a better room and better monitors could jump up my results faster. But on the other hand, I know that getting used to what I have has an enormous value. That may be what Chris ment earlier.

    The worst thing many people do is to use tools because they've been said to be good instead of really needing them.
    The right choice sometime is to not use a plugin when the source really doesn't need it.

    Like many, I decided to invest in good preamps and microphones because I believe those are the things that can't be emulated ITB. Also, the better my recordings get, the easier mixing becomes... I just hope every beginners would understand this sooner.
     
    Namin likes this.
  7. ChrisH

    ChrisH Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2011
    Location:
    Iowa
    True words. Preach.
     
    audiokid likes this.
  8. audiokid

    audiokid Chris Staff

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2000
    Location:
    BC, Canada
    Home Page:
    Solid words said right there, Marco!

    Good front end, good monitoring= substantially less need to twist a dial or become a forensic ITB scientist lol!
    Good front end lowers the confusion on how to mix because good tracked audio sounds good from the beginning.
    Good tracking translates all the way to the master bus. Also blends better with high quality keyboards (analog and digital), VSTi and samples.

    Which is why I keep saying, most DAW platforms have the fundamentals of what's needed to mix most music in the stock channel strip. Gain, Pre/Post EQ, AUX, BUS, Fader Mute.

    Summery: Good tracking front end > clean DAW code rendering after makes all the sense in the world. Saves money from redundant upgrading plugins that are more about pretty GUI than wow factor.

    My third party plugin arsenal becomes the "special plugins" that go belong ITB fundamentals.
     
    pcrecord likes this.
  9. dvdhawk

    dvdhawk Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2008
    Location:
    Western Pennsylvania, USA
    I agree with PC 100%, it is extremely important to know the traits of your speakers and room. There's no amount of money you can spend that is any more crucial than that familiarity with your own monitor system.

    Having reasonably accurate monitors is less about, 'can I create a good mix through these speakers?', than it is 'how is this mix going to translate when played on the infinite other playback system combinations in the world?" It's common practice for the world's finest MEs to have a pair of cheap consumer bookshelf speakers in their set-up alongside their insanely expensive ultra-pristine monitors, so they can A/B the highest standard (their monitors) and a more common standard their end-listeners might be using.

    The biggest problem with using garden-variety speakers usually seems to be deficient / over-hyped bass. You can usually get a good mix using speakers that are lacking in the low-end, but then when you play it back through an average stereo system the bass will be booming, and everything will sound muddy because you made all of your mix judgements compensating for the lack of bass in your mixing speakers. Having a mixing environment that is fairly neutral is important for the same reasons. Otherwise, it's like trying to paint an accurate self-portrait using a funhouse mirror.
     
    pcrecord likes this.
  10. pcrecord

    pcrecord Quality recording seeker ! Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2013
    Location:
    Quebec, Canada
    Home Page:
    That's very true !
    One thing to also consider is our own tastes and habits. I played live for so many years I've been used to hear a lot of bass (being a drummer which is always behind the PA)
    So in my case I naturally mix with too much bass. I therefor decided to ajust my sub to exceed good balance just a bit. That way my mixes are not overblown with bass like they used to.
    Of course, it makes me fight a bit more against muddiness but I think the exercice is benificial to me so far.
    Knowing ourself + knowing our the listening environement = success !
     
    dvdhawk and audiokid like this.
  11. audiokid

    audiokid Chris Staff

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2000
    Location:
    BC, Canada
    Home Page:
    Wow, I do the exact thing too, Marco, because of years performing behind a PA.
     
    pcrecord likes this.
  12. mactreouser

    mactreouser Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2014
    Great Points!
     
  13. mactreouser

    mactreouser Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2014
    Awesome and that's what I believe too! One more thing to be concerned "Heavy Load" when keep pumping in Third-Party plugins which stock ones did its job well too!
     
    audiokid likes this.
  14. mactreouser

    mactreouser Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2014
    It seems, ROOM Treatment might be the FIRST to be concerned?!
     
    ChrisH and audiokid like this.
  15. mactreouser

    mactreouser Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2014
    Haha... an engineer told me few years back "Do Not let the Guitarist sit right beside you when you Mix" = Guitar tracks might obviously out stand! So, when a Drummer, Bassist, Vocalist... sit right beside an Mixing Engineer... what will happens? Haha...
     
    Brother Junk and pcrecord like this.

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice