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Recording Gear means nothing if we can't stay in business.

Discussion in 'Music Business' started by kef, Dec 6, 2001.

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  • AT5047

    The New AT5047 Premier Studio Microphone Purity Transformed

  1. atlasproaudio

    atlasproaudio Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2001
    Location:
    Tampa Bay, FL
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    Originally posted by Justin M Stretch:
    it's becoming that easy these days why pay for studio hire?

    It looks like you have the business all figured out. I suppose I should tell all the clients we have booked to go learn how to record themselves. Other than years of experience and a substantial investment in gear and the room, why would they need us when they can use Digi Free with Mackie preamps :roll: ?
     
  2. osmuir

    osmuir Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2001
    if you are really serious: you want it to sound good.

    studios offer
    1. better acoustic environments, for assessing how good yr mix is.
    2. better gear.
    3. EXPERIENCED ENGINEERS who actualy have it be their job to make stuff sound good.

    you can build yr own sports car, yet people still buy them...huh.

    --owen
     
  3. Ufele

    Ufele Guest

    Justin M Stretch wrote......"Why pay for studio hire?"


    I agree to an extent. If we are talking about a demo, It doesn't have to be a full blown Quality production.

    A record exec once said..."hiss (and mush) never kill a hit song". I add "Star quality shines through like a diamond in the mud".

    Do your demo (or pre-demo) at home if you can AND WHEN YOU WANT SOME VERY SERIOUS STUFF, Look for professional help (or rather look for money).

    IF YOU DON'T HAVE THE MONEY, USE WHAT YOU'VE GOT...your equipment(whatever it is) Goodluck.
     
  4. Jim Klein

    Jim Klein Guest

    This thread doesn't really apply to me directly (lucky me) since my studio is private and for my own use only, but as someone who was in the studio scene as an engineer/producer for 20 years, my take is that SERVICE is EVERYTHING. I always used to advise friends and clients who were starting up commercial facilities to budget as much as possible for client amenities and interior design. There used to be this one studio in midtown Manhattan that had a Tascam 8516 and a Sound Workshop Series 30 and outbooked most of the Studer/Neve rooms in town. This guy had every customer amenity possible, free drinks, super comfy lounge, giant control room couch, all the equipment encased in Argosy-style custom black formica enclosures. He specialized in working with all of the aspiring and working Broadway show actors and composers doing demos, albums, and some records, and the guy was booked ALL THE TIME at 75 bucks an hour when everybody else was giving time away. Most of your customers are not going to know the difference between an LA2A and an RNC, and you can make a lot of clients happy and comfy if you spend the difference on client goodies..... they'll keep coming back and THEN you can buy the vintage gear.
     
  5. anonymous

    anonymous Guests

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2001
    Good points - studio ambience, personality of the engineer, and the ability to inspire confidence are probably all more important than any single piece of equipment. While there often may be specific demands, with my clients it has more to do with having good room acoustics (for classical recordings especially) or a great piano - rather than specific recording gear.

    For most musicians it comes down to working where they feel they are most comfortable - because it is there they will get the best performance out of themselves. For some that me be a lower-profile (lower cost/lower pressure) room that does not necessarily resemble a cover shot from Mix magazine. This is all assuming that you have at least the minimal skills and gear as to not butcher the above great performance.
     
  6. atlasproaudio

    atlasproaudio Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2001
    Location:
    Tampa Bay, FL
    Home Page:
    I suppose this is valid for a lot of people, but there is a whole different group of people you are ruling out. Our clientel/business is based on people who want really quality productions (within the limits of their own talents of course) for not a whole lot of money (ie full length self produced with no 'studio' preproduction involved for less than $6K). Some even fall in far below that because they have everything tight as tits when they come in and are ready to blow it out. The thing mixes itself with customers like that if I track it right. So these Indie label releases or completely independent releases aren't going to make a lot of money compared to major label records, but the musicians involved at least get to hear their songs in a final quality that comes close to something on the radio (hell, sometimes better with all the Alisad $*^t you hear these days). To many people, that is worth spending out of pocket for.
     
  7. They have lowered their standards but they don't know any better. Roland is not putting out ads that say, "The V Series is for the recording musician with lower standards". There spending a ton of money to undercut you guys. There telling the average Joe that he/she can get the same qaulity recording at a fraction of the price a pro studio would cost them. You and I know this is BS, but the typical consumer doesn't know that nor do they want to.
    I would guess that the majority of studios make a large portion of their funds through musicians looking to cut demos that they will use to distribute to everyone and their mother to get that big break. Roland, and the others have just advertised the small studio owner right out of the market, and you guys have done nothing about it. The percentage of people who know the difference will be to small for you to rely on.
    I suggest you guys start fighting back. Get together. Put your funds together, and advertise in the magazines. Ever considered TV ads? Their cheap. I should know I'm in the business.

    Robert
     
  8. [/qb][/QUOTE]I suppose this is valid for a lot of people, but there is a whole different group of people you are ruling out. Our clientel/business is based on people who want really quality productions.[/QB][/QUOTE]

    Nathan,
    It seems to me that these people make a small percentage of the market. To small for all the competing studios to survive off of. What do you think?

    Robert
     
  9. atlasproaudio

    atlasproaudio Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2001
    Location:
    Tampa Bay, FL
    Home Page:
    I don't really know. If you set the standard, those are the types of customers you get. If you take anything, anywhere, anytime as long as it pays (even not so well), then that's what you will attract. I personally have different goals in mind and want as little weak links in my engineering portfolio as possible. One bad sounding project due to being rushed or the musicians skimping on little things can do more damage than a few great sounding projects can do good.
     
  • AT5047

    The New AT5047 Premier Studio Microphone Purity Transformed

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