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Roland vs. 1880 - transferring individual tracks onto other machine to be mixed and mastered m

Discussion in 'Digital Recorders' started by Jonathan Larkin, Sep 9, 2019.

  1. Jonathan Larkin

    Jonathan Larkin Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2019
    Location:
    east falmouth, ma
    Hi, i`ve done some recording on the 1880 and plan to do more . I`m not very techy and it took a long time to learn how to use this machine - I still have a lot to learn - but i`m happy to just be able to put tracks down and mix o.k. creating a decent soundscape . However , once played back on c.d. it sounds o.k. - but I`m missing a bit of spark or punch that a pro engineer i`m sure could remedy on a superior machine - i would ideally like to have a pro to spice it up for me . Does this sound doable ? I have around 10 tracks per song on mostly acoustic instruments - fiddle , accordion , percussion , etc. What price range could i expect to pay for such services . All thoughts and advice would be greatly appreciated - Thanks.
     
  2. Kurt Foster

    Kurt Foster Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2002
    Location:
    77 Sunset Lane.
    what you are asking for is possible but mileage may vary. a lot depends on how well you have recorded the tracks in the first place. initial capture is the most critical part of recording and while tracks may be "sweetened" at mix or in post production there is no substitute for a well recorded performance. good luck with your project.
     
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  3. Makzimia

    Makzimia The Minstrel Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2014
    Location:
    Hyde, England
    To add to what Kurt said. I personally did a lot of recording on a VS1880. I sadly made the mistake of printing (recording) the built in effects at the time on all tracks. I’ve been able to extract the tracks on an older windows laptop from CDs. This involves software and produces individual tracks of left and right in wave format if stereo. That along with number of track/virtual track also from memory.

    I do not have the 1880, which is why I did what I’ve done. Since you do have it. I would involve it with audio outputs to a DAW computer instead.
     
  4. Jonathan Larkin

    Jonathan Larkin Active Member

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    Sep 7, 2019
    Location:
    east falmouth, ma
    Thanks - i`m not very advanced tech wise - i wouldn`t know the 1st thing about doing any kind of transfer - i pretty much just want to focus on my compositions and leave the tech stuff to some one else - It took a lot of time and frustration to figure out how to lay down tracks on the 1880 . i just know they can sound better and i`m willing to pay . I`m an old guy and pretty busy . I like laying down tracks in my little studio when ever i get the chance as opposed to going to a far away studio on a schedule - that`s huge for me . I bought the 1880 about 20 years ago and bought 2 more a few years ago so i would have some back up . I `m not adverse to learning how to use more modern technology - it`s just that i don`t want to spend a lot of time doing so - in my situation it may be more cost effective hiring some one to finishing the tech side of my recordings . I am happy with the initial recording capabilities of the Roland just not the mix capabilities.
     
  5. pcrecord

    pcrecord Quality recording seeker ! Distinguished Member

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  6. Kurt Foster

    Kurt Foster Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2002
    Location:
    77 Sunset Lane.
    i took a look at the owners manual and what a nightmare that thing is to operate. my hat is off to you Johnathan for being able to wade through it all and actually record with it. it's a much different world now. the new Tascam 24 is so simple to record with. just put in an SD card, arm the tracks and hit record. when you finish take the SD card and load it into a computer to mix or just mix it to a stereo file on the Model 24
     
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  7. Makzimia

    Makzimia The Minstrel Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Hyde, England
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  8. Jonathan Larkin

    Jonathan Larkin Active Member

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    sounds like that may be a great option - i`ll have to look into the tascam - Thanks !
     
  9. Jonathan Larkin

    Jonathan Larkin Active Member

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    Sep 7, 2019
    Location:
    east falmouth, ma
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  10. Jonathan Larkin

    Jonathan Larkin Active Member

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    Location:
    east falmouth, ma
  11. Jonathan Larkin

    Jonathan Larkin Active Member

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    well , i guess my next question would be is the recording quality of Tascam 24 is good as the Roland vs.1800 ?
     
  12. Jonathan Larkin

    Jonathan Larkin Active Member

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    Location:
    east falmouth, ma
     
  13. Jonathan Larkin

    Jonathan Larkin Active Member

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    i mean the 1880
     
  14. Jonathan Larkin

    Jonathan Larkin Active Member

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    Regarding the Tascam 24 -How much memory can i store or how many 5 minute individual quality tracks can i lay down before needing to move it to make room for the next song ? Thanks .
     
  15. Kurt Foster

    Kurt Foster Distinguished Member

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    Jul 2, 2002
    Location:
    77 Sunset Lane.
    the Tascam uses SD memory cards so it depends on how big your card is. you can fill one up and then just switch to a new card.
     
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  16. kmetal

    kmetal Kyle P. Gushue Distinguished Member

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    They make 120gb SD cards now, which would handle several albums worth of multitracked audio.

    To touch on a couple other things in the thread. In the U.S. you can expect to pay 25-100$ per hour for mixing, possibly more if you went with an A-list commercial music mixer.

    I like all in one units, and got good mileage from my tascam portastudio. However mixing is not generally their strong suit. This is where a DAW like reaper, or garage band, ect ect, offers tons of capability and flexibility. The learning curve is moderate, but there is a ton of information and tutorials on youtube. Something not available when i started.

    I would send your music to a professional or two or three, and see if you like it. They can also give you input on your recordings and help improve them at the source.

    At that point i would decide if you want to get into mixing my own stuff or if the arrangement with the pro suits you better. If you decide to go diy, a decent entry level interface, speakers and acoustic treatment, will cost 600-1k USD. A good way to learn fast is to attend a mix session with a pro and watch what he does, and ask some questions.
     
  17. Jonathan Larkin

    Jonathan Larkin Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2019
    Location:
    east falmouth, ma
    Thanks - great response - It`s almost mandatory that i would have the mixing / editing capabilities on the tascam the same as my v.s. 1880 . I need to be able to rough mix it as well as move or cut as well as loop musical phrases before getting ready to send song out to a final mix somewhere or on something else. Don`t know if the tascam can do that . From what i have read there seems to be quite a number of people that have not been that happy with the tascam 24 when it comes to home recording - mainly about the lack of instructions . It seems it`s meant more to be about recording live bands - nice mixer that can record if needed. I think i`m better off trying to find an engineer that can transfer my tracks to a more modern machine - transferring the individual tracks seems doable . Finding someone who would be willing do it might be a little challenging - i don`t know . I will have to ask local studios . hopefully they won`t be too busy . I feel it might be akin to asking a plumber to find hardware and faucets to fit a 100 year old sink. I think i could afford in the upper range of the mixing service you mentioned . . I can do a rough mix with 7 or 8 tracks on my v.s.1880 in less than an hour . So I`m supposing it would take an engineer 2-3 hours to make a more finished song - but what do i know ? . Anyway , thanks again for the info.
     
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  18. Kurt Foster

    Kurt Foster Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2002
    Location:
    77 Sunset Lane.
    probably better! i'm sure the Tascam would have better converters, mic pres and eq's.

    you can mix on the 24 but there's no editing facilities. i have become a proponent of these stand alone gizmos. first off, they are very cost effective. they work well enough and sound good enough to be a viable solution imo and being limited to 24/ 48 (which these days is the only reason to record in a DAW) isn't an issue for me. very few people can even hear the differences between 48 and 96. 48 is plenty good enough for production in a stand alone recorder where the mix's are being done on the recorder.

    seriously the Roland is a bit long in the tooth and at some point you are likely to need to move on. devices like these aren't intended to last forever and are impossible to service in many cases. your current difficulty in moving your files in and out are just the tip of the iceberg imo. as much as i hate to say this, if you really need to cut and paste, loop and move stuff around, perhaps it's time to take the leap into a computer based DAW .... if just for editing. a combination of almost any laptop, a simple to use free program like Audacity for editing (which is what Audacity is supposed to be used for) and the Tascam or other stand alone recorder like a Zoom should do. their operation is simple compared to what you have to go through with the Roland.

    that's fair to say. it is not an editor. but it is an interface. it's intended use is a mixer and stand alone recorder or as a 24 channel interface into a DAW. it is not a workstation. actually that's what i like about it most. but it is super simple to move your files to a DAW . for what you want to do you can simply pull out the SD card and hand it to the person you want to mix your project. no weird file formats. no ZIP DISKS, no CDRs. no hard drives to fail. solid state memory. no moving parts, simple to duplicate for back ups. you can also move files to a computer via USB as you record or after. hook up the USB connection to your computer and the SD card shows up as a drive on your screen. super easy.

    as far as the lack of instructions, there's not really that much to it. again, that's what i like about it!
     
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  19. Jonathan Larkin

    Jonathan Larkin Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2019
    Location:
    east falmouth, ma
    Thanks for taking the time about all of this. The thing is i`m probably the most untech person you will ever meet. It took me a long time to figure out the roland- - but now that I had gotten t it figured out i can fly around those editing functions fairly quickly so that`s no problem for me - However , that tascam sounds pretty tempting - i would definitely use it to record my band live as i have tried to do before with the roland [ that was an adventure trying to record individual tracks on that - there was some success , but very clumsy for sure ] I think the fact that that tracks would be more accessible to an engineer may be the selling point for me. My guess is the Tascam is superior in recording quality - i used to own a teac - 3440 [ i think ] 1/2 inch reel to reel 4 track - I believe Teac was affiliated somehow with tascam. Anyway , I know they are good quality and have been around awhile. You may have changed my mind - Thanks
     
  20. Jonathan Larkin

    Jonathan Larkin Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2019
    Location:
    east falmouth, ma
    Hello again - just wondering - how do you get on with such a small screen ? - I think it may be too tiny for me to know what i`m doing - I know you can transfer all the info to a computer and have it all on a large screen - but it sounds like you can`t do any actual recording while using a computer. I think I would find myself constantly going back and forth between the 2 . But maybe that is easy to do. Not sure. Many thanks for any additional advice.
     
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