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Royer Microphone Comparisons

Discussion in 'Microphones (live or studio)' started by audiokid, May 28, 2010.

  • Royer ribbon microphones - Why?

    Simply put, when you put a quality ribbon mic on an instrument, voice, or other sound source, what you hear on playback is closer to real sound in nature than with any other kind of microphone.

  1. DonnyThompson

    DonnyThompson Distinguished Member

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    Which is precisely the time when you pull out a cheap, spare, student model horn that you carry for emergencies.... and then beat him nearly to death with it, making him repeat after you, over and over,
    "Sir Duke! Now SAY IT! SIR DUKE!! Take The A-Train! Mood Indigo! Sophisticated Lady! Say It, You good for nothing, dumb-assed, disco curve EQ setting - fader pushing - chair moistening - oxygen wasting - stupid M******F%#er!!!

    I guarantee a standing ovation. ;)
     
  2. rjuly

    rjuly Active Member

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    Dec 15, 2014
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    London, U.K.
    I can't say enough good about Royer mics. I was recently financially ill advised enough to try out an sf-12. Still recovering from that purchase.... But, hahahahahahahha IT'S MINE, ALL MINE, ALL MINE!!!!! Seriously smooth, overheads to die for, piano transients intact, and on and on. Very versatile. Now need to start saving for some 121's....
     
    audiokid likes this.
  3. audiokid

    audiokid Chris Staff

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    Mar 20, 2000
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    BC, Canada
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    Indeed!

    The SF series makes recording so pleasurable and accurate. I have SF-24 and it is one of my most loved microphones. Glad to hear your love and mention for Royer.
     
  4. DonnyThompson

    DonnyThompson Distinguished Member

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    At first I misread your post - the "ill advised" part - thinking, "how could he not like the SF12? " Having used (and loved) it on a few occasions myself over the years...

    Then I re-read your post, and realized that it was the cost part that you were referring to ... LOL.

    But then again, you get what ya pay for, right? Considering how great they sound- I've never heard any Royer mic not sound great, nor have I ever talked to anyone who hasn't thought the same thing - and adding to that their warranty, their mics are well worth the prices they command.

    As far as I know and the last time I checked, all Royer mics carry a lifetime warranty, parts and labor, as long as the mic is with the original owner. For a company to stand behind its product to that extent, well, that's really saying something.
    I'm trying to think of another high end audio manufacturer that offers a warranty like that, and I honestly can't think of any. Some offer pretty good warranties - but lifetime P&L?
    There may be a few others who do, but off the top of my head, I can't think of any... it's pretty rare - and a testament to just how well-crafted their mics are.

    I was reading an article several years back in Pro Audio, or SOS maybe... where a Royer company rep said that, "no one who has ever auditioned a Royer mic has ever returned it..."

    Based on my own experiences with them ( I LOVE the combination of a Royer 121 and a Senny 421 or SM57/58 on guitar amps) - I don't have any problems in believing that claim to be true. ;)
     
  5. thatjeffguy

    thatjeffguy Active Member

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    I have a pair of R-121 mics and love them!

    BTW Donny, Charter Oak also offers a lifetime warranty on their mics.

    ~Jeff
     
  6. drbluegrass

    drbluegrass Active Member

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    Feb 14, 2016
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    10102 Lupine Trail, Bloomfield, IA
    I'm getting an outstanding sound recording acoustic guitar and banjo (bluegrass music) with an R122 and sE Electronics RN17 in m/s configuration using the R122 as the side mic. Nice full bodied, punchy sound, from both instruments with just the right amount of top end and air (not too much, just right). Wonderful sound.
     
    DonnyThompson and audiokid like this.
  7. audiokid

    audiokid Chris Staff

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    BC, Canada
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    right on. If you care to upload a track anytime (see Upload a File button) , please feel free to do that! Its always good to listen ( banjo!!) to what our members are doing. Makes for more fun discussion too. :)
     
  8. Boswell

    Boswell Moderator Distinguished Member

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    Have you looked at an X-Y phase plot of your resulting L and R channels? I believe you are mistaken in thinking you have a true M-S pair of channels when using a pressure-sensitive microphone for the M channel and a velocity microphone for the S-channel. The signals from these two are inherently 90 degrees out of phase, and will not combine correctly in the M-S decoder to form a stereo signal. This error cannot be corrected by simple inversion of one of the signals (use of the "phase" button on a console or in a DAW). For proper M-S, you must use a pair of microphones that have the same phase angle response to a sound waveform.

    Many studio pros are not aware of this problem either. Don't worry, though - if you like the sound you are getting from the instruments (when listening in stereo but also checking with your monitoring switched to mono), keep it, and ignore the technicalities.
     
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  9. thatjeffguy

    thatjeffguy Active Member

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    Boswell, I'm glad you pointed out this important fact. You have posted on this in the past and I so appreciate you sharing your technical expertise with us. After I became aware of this through reading of your earlier posts on the subject, my curious brain is trying to wrap itself around the "why" of the 90 degree phase difference. It seems that one of the two types of mics must start it's voltage change at the wave's zero point while the other must begin at either a peak or a valley of the wave.
    I would love to know how this works... I have a very fundamental understanding of electricity... I know how induction works and how a capacitor works, though I lack any understanding of how a varying capacitance is used in a circuit to control voltage. If you could explain the basics in lay language I could quiet my curious brain!
    Thanks again for your contribution to this community!
    ~Jeff
     
  10. Boswell

    Boswell Moderator Distinguished Member

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    It's to do with the two different principles of operation of the transducers on fig-8 ribbon mics and condenser mics.

    The transducer in a ribbon mic operates according to Faraday's magnetic induction rule, where it's the velocity of the current-carrying element in a magnetic field that generates the e.m.f. (voltage). In a capacitor (condensor) mic, the output voltage is a function of the amplitude of the movement of the diaphragm. If you take a simple sound field in the form of a pure sinewave, the the maximum amplitude occurs at maximum pressure difference, where the maximum velocity occurs as the pressure difference goes through zero. These happen 90 degrees apart in the sinewave cycle, hence the phase difference in the output voltage of the two types of microphones when placed in the same sound field.

    I hear you say: "Ah, but what about moving-coil (dynamic) microphones - surely they use magnetic induction and therefore must be velocity-sensitive?" Yes, they are, but they are also housed in a vented container that has baffles and mazes for the sound coming from the rear to negotiate. This is done in order to give the microphone a cardioid or similar directional response and not a fig-8. The rear baffling alters the phase characteristic to be nearer that of a pressure-sensitive microphone rather than a velocity-sensitive. Hence it's possible to use a mix of moving-coil and condenser microphones to make a functional M-S array, but to get a fig-8 pattern for the S channel involves using either a dual-diaphragm condenser microphone switched to fig-8 pattern or else a pair of dynamic cardioids pointed in opposite directions and wired in inverse-series. The inverse-series wiring can, of course, be achieved by summing separate input channels with one of them polarity-inverted in your mixer or DAW.
     
    kmetal likes this.
  11. thatjeffguy

    thatjeffguy Active Member

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    Boswell, thank you so much for your very clear explanation! I thought it must be something like that, but did not factor in the velocity aspect. It makes sense to me now!
    Thanks again,
    ~Jeff
     
  • Royer ribbon microphones - Why?

    Simply put, when you put a quality ribbon mic on an instrument, voice, or other sound source, what you hear on playback is closer to real sound in nature than with any other kind of microphone.

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