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Tip Of The Day - #2

Discussion in 'Microphones (live or studio)' started by hargerst, Feb 22, 2001.

  1. hargerst

    hargerst Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2001
    Well, that was a picture I took for EvAnna Manley's photo page of some of the rec.audio.pro people. Only stipulation was that you had to be naked. I still wanted to have some sort of audio theme so, I did this picture for her. The rest of the pictures are at:
    CIPO - OPIC

    All my photos of the AES 2000 show (which include Fletcher, Stephen Paul and a bunch of other people) are ar:
    http://www.itrstudio.com/aes/
     
  2. Mixerman

    Mixerman Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2001
    Originally posted by hargerst:

    All my photos of the AES 2000 show (which include Fletcher, Stephen Paul and a bunch of other people...


    And nary a picture of Mixerman. You know, I don't show up in photos...

    Mixerman
     
  3. With the player seated in a comfortable position, bring the microphone in (from a boom stand behind the player) over the player's right shoulder, about level with the player's ear, and roughly 6" out in front of the player.

    I like to try this position before all others because it's seems to sound the most natural,(most likely for the reasons you've mentioned). I will then 'add in' other mics if that is what I'm looking for, but this,(as well as micing about 3 ft. in front of the performer) gives me the best reference of what the sound is actually like IMO.

    Good to see you here Harvey
    Steve
     
  4. hargerst

    hargerst Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2001
    Originally posted by Mixerman:
    And nary a picture of Mixerman. You know, I don't show up in photos...
    Mixerman
    Or in mirrors, either. Now, where the hell did I put that garlic wreath? :confused:
     
  5. RNorman

    RNorman Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2001
    Originally posted by hargerst:
    AS DB noted in his RAP message about the piano recording he did on the Boston album, it's actually a very useful position on just about everything a musician plays. I've done it on piano before with mics placed just slightly wider than the player's ears, with acoustic guitar as you have here, and with congas, and as a different take on drum overheads (although that can become problematic with the mics pointing somewhat back out to the other players). Doesn't work real hot with horn and woodwind players! <g> Actually it doesn't work with any instrument played by one's mouth. Still an excellent technique when you're stumped for the sound the talent says he hears.
     
  6. RNorman

    RNorman Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2001
    Originally posted by hargerst:
    Oh, God!! Did I have that picture of me still up there? I did that for EvAnna Manley's page.

    And it's still there, which is where I think Mark got it from! I don't remember seeing it on your site.
     
  7. RNorman

    RNorman Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2001
    Originally posted by Mixerman:
    And nary a picture of Mixerman. You know, I don't show up in photos...

    Mixerman


    No shutterspeed is quick enough to catch you, at least in a car from what I hear! <g>
     
  8. k.w.blackwell

    k.w.blackwell Member

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2001
    Miking Acoustic Guitar


    Harvey, I used a cheap LCD mike for this
    technique recently and it worked remarkably
    well for me. I found that because I was
    the rather bass-shy R0de NT-1 (ok, so please
    don't evict me), I not only did not have any
    problem with boominess, but I had not *enough*
    low end. So I augmented with an SM-57 (ok,
    sm-58 with the ball head removed) down at
    the saddle (whatever it's called) pointing
    up across the bridge, but slightly in front
    to avoid too much variation from guitar
    movement and to get a bit of oomph from the
    sound hole. The proximity effect was just
    enough. My relatively-untrained ears judged
    this to be by far the best sound I've gotten
    from that particular acoustic guitar yet. I
    also picked up just enough room ambience to
    make me feel that my small room sounds pretty
    nice. So, in conclusion, I think this is
    not only a great miking position, but a great
    starting point for others.
     

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