Would a pre-amp help my sound quality get better?

Discussion in 'Recording' started by crucified, Jun 22, 2007.

Tags:
  1. crucified

    crucified Guest

    Right now I have a Behringer XENYX 802 mixer and an AKG Perception 100 large diaphragm condenser microphone and it's goin through my computer. I was wondering if I bought a preamp if it would boost my sound quality up any? I have good quality now BUT I was recording in a studio that was top notch equip. so I am trying to keep all of my tracks sounding as good as they used to sound quality wise, I know I wont have the exact sound becuase the mic. I was using was a 1200 dollar mic. there but I know I can make my quality sound better then what it does. Any advice would be appreciated!!! Thanks for taking your time to read this!!!
     
  2. AudioGaff

    AudioGaff Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2001
    Location:
    Silicon Valley
    A real good mic pre CAN make a difference in quality, there are other variables. But your going to need to spend the money to get there. The weakest link in the chain theory applies like always. A real good mic pre with a crap mic and low budget audio interface/mixer is not ever going to give you best possible results. In your specific case, I'd suggest a great high end mic first.
     
  3. crucified

    crucified Guest

    Yeah I am happy with my perception 100 and am sticking with it for a while I think eventually I will buy myself the Rode NT-1 but I am wondering about the preamp and other things that can improve the quality of sound.
     
  4. Davedog

    Davedog Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2001
    Location:
    Pacific NW
    Like Gaff said....The weakest link in the chain will always limit the level of the gears abilities. Sometimes this link is human in nature...........

    I doubt that you have enough experience and ear training to truly tell the difference of a highend mic pre compared to an inexpensive one. Dont misinterpret this.....Most people dont. I'm not sure I do.... :lol:

    Because I am such a mic slut, I would get a higher end mic first before attempting the long process of searching for pres and other gear that will make a huge impact. And no disrespect, but the Perception series is NOT really high-end. Not bad, just not "high-end".
     
  5. crucified

    crucified Guest

    Okay and I am not taking it offensively LOL it's cool and yes you are right I am new to this. I ahve been recording in studios for years but barely started my own since my studio guy isnt around anymore. What do you think of the Rode NT-1?
     
  6. jimmys69

    jimmys69 Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2011
    Location:
    Arvada Colorado
    The NT1A will sound better than your AKG. But not necessarily on everything. A nice preamp will only give you good results if your signal chain is worthy of good results. IMO, if your interface costs less than your best mic, then a $1000 preamp is not going to help. A decent starter preamp that will actually help a poor quality mic, will run you over $500. Anything under that level will just be wasting money for what you are hoping for.
     
  7. LittleJohn

    LittleJohn Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2007
    Location:
    Houston, Texas
    Lots of good advice here. I agree with all of it.
    Respectfully, If I were in your place, I would not buy a new mic or a standalone mic pre.
    I would however, replace the Behringer with a different small board that has pre-amps that will be good enough for you for a long time.
    (mackie, yamaha, A&H come to mind)

    My $0.02
     
  8. GZsound

    GZsound Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2001
    Location:
    Near Portland, Oregon
    Home Page:
    The other issue is the sound of your room. A high dollar studio most likely has spent a good deal of time and money on acoustics in their recording space.

    I think the mindset that a microphone preamp is some wonder tool that will give you amazing results is wrong. A decent pre can improve your sound, but by small amounts not by huge leaps. Getting a decent sounding mixer would be my first choice and then invest in different flavors of mics. I have found that the microphone is much more important than the preamp.

    You can pretty much be assured that you will not get a high end sound by using the cheapest mic and mixer you can buy, especially if you are recording in an untreated room. However, thousands of hits have been recorded using a basic Shure SM58 mic, but in a great sounding room through a decent signal chain.

    My suggestion would be in this order:

    1. Room
    2. Mixer
    3. Mic
    4. Monitors

    Only after those items have been addressed would I even think of buying a mic pre. And most folks consider "decent" mic preamps to start at around $500 (RNP) and go up from there.
     

Share This Page