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How can I tune a virtual instrument (vst/vsti) to A 444 hz ?

Hello, I am currently using FL Studio (eventually would like to move on to Pro Tools). I am wondering, how can I tune a virtual instrument? I know standard tuning is A440 hz, however I would like to tune to A444. I am stuck on how to go about this.
Comments much appreciated, thank you.

Comments

Space Man Sun, 01/25/2015 - 18:25

Hmmm thanks for the reply but Im not sure this answers my question. I want the A4 to be tuned to the frequency of 444 hertz instead of 440 hertz, this will cause C5 to be of the frequency 528 hertz which is quite a magical frequency supressed by most modern music as this frequency is not included in the tuning A440. 528 hertz is very intriguing and I suggest anybody who enjoys music to search it up.

Tony Carpenter Sun, 01/25/2015 - 18:36

Space Man, post: 424226, member: 48818 wrote: Hmm so you are saying if you wish to switch the tunings you use a pitch shift feature that applies to individual VSTs? I wonder how I would go about this in Fl.

Not sure of how the side panel of each track is in FL, but in Logic Pro X, and others I have used, it's usually a setting in the midi settings.

Space Man Sun, 01/25/2015 - 18:39

Makzimia, post: 424228, member: 48344 wrote: Not sure of how the side panel of each track is in FL, but in Logic Pro X, and others I have used, it's usually a setting in the midi settings.

Hmm, and that is for an individual instrument or the entire project? I do believe the project in FL can be changed between A440 and A432, which doesnt solve it and Im unsure how that can effect individual instruments...

Reverend Lucas Sun, 01/25/2015 - 20:21

You're looking to shift everything up by the same ratio for every note, right? If I'm understanding right, Makzimia is correct, in that what you're looking for is a pitch shifter. I haven't worked in FL, but you should be able to simply add a pitch shift VST to your effects chain after your VSTi. You just need to find a shifter that works in cents, rather than one that only allows half step intervals. In your example, you'd be shifting up about 16 cents.

Kapt.Krunch Mon, 01/26/2015 - 04:45

Questions:

Do you want it shifted as you play from, say, a keyboard controller...to monitor as played?

Or, do you want it shifted after it was recorded as a MIDI track in a sequence?

Is it just that one track, or more, that will need shifted?

What VSTi is it?

If you have a keyboard controller, and using it, what is it? (As in...is it possible the keyboard can send tuning information to the computer MIDI track, if the software also supports it?)

Just some thoughts.

Kapt.Krunch

paulears Tue, 01/27/2015 - 10:31

The point, which the poster didn't make clear is that there is a train of thought that certain particular frequencies resonate in harmony with the universe, and some believe that includes DNA. Personally I truly believe it's a complete pile of dog poo, with absolutely no basis in science, simply opinion - and as such, until proven, I discount it totally.

The difference between 440 and 444, is a tiny percentage - less than 1%, and I doubt non-musical people can hear it! I can't say about FL - never even heard of it, but all my software can handle pitch shifts of cents - that's 100th of a tone. Guitarists who tune by ear often pick very non-standardised tunings by accident - and never notice until they try to play with a fixed pitch instrument.

So tune away - but as for it sounding better in a single pitch, it doesn't work for me at all. Bach, of course was the expert at this with his experiments with temperament between the old system and the new version that worked in any key, as contrasted with the old system that only sounded 'right' in it's composed key.

As for 'magical' frequencies - audiophile hi-fi forums often have people with magic hearing, so maybe ask them. Barnum stuff, sorry!

Kurt Foster Tue, 01/27/2015 - 13:11

paulears, post: 424310, member: 47782 wrote: The point, which the poster didn't make clear is that there is a train of thought that certain particular frequencies resonate in harmony with the universe, and some believe that includes DNA. Personally I truly believe it's a complete pile of dog poo, with absolutely no basis in science, simply opinion - and as such, until proven, I discount it totally.

The difference between 440 and 444, is a tiny percentage - less than 1%, and I doubt non-musical people can hear it! I can't say about FL - never even heard of it, but all my software can handle pitch shifts of cents - that's 100th of a tone. Guitarists who tune by ear often pick very non-standardised tunings by accident - and never notice until they try to play with a fixed pitch instrument.

So tune away - but as for it sounding better in a single pitch, it doesn't work for me at all. Bach, of course was the expert at this with his experiments with temperament between the old system and the new version that worked in any key, as contrasted with the old system that only sounded 'right' in it's composed key.

As for 'magical' frequencies - audiophile hi-fi forums often have people with magic hearing, so maybe ask them. Barnum stuff, sorry!

mmm kay .......

Space Man Fri, 06/26/2015 - 01:18

Well it has been a while since I have been back into music creation. I am now back at it and plan to never quit again. I have found a work-around to my question. Here is a tool that detects frequency: http://tuneit.free.fr/Site/Home.html it has a standalone version as well as VST version. Just add VST in mixer over an instrument or sample. All virtual instruments should have a pitch nob or a way to edit pitch, turn the nob till you get the desired tuning that will be detected by this frequency detector. I will keep looking for a VST that detects and edits pitch both but this is a work-around for now. Tuning samples and instruments are key to good sound, if frequencies clash there will be underlining disorder. I am a student to music theory and do not know much but will gladly share anything I know and learn. Glad to help anyone who reads this.

ps- as for the resistance to A444 tuning: A444 is the true musical tunings and that is not bullshit. Keep an open mind. I won't go into detail of why our society does not typically use A444, if you are curious, search for the answers and feel free to share that info here.

paulears Fri, 06/26/2015 - 03:12

Until I ever sit next to a string player, trombonist, fretless bass player or indeed a singer who even attempts to check their tuning to within a few Hz - tuning to this level of preciseness is clearly ridiculous. Indeed, imagine what a string section who all played exactly the same note would actually sound like? The notion that clashing frequencies creates disorder shows a total lack of understanding about how music works. Conflict, discord and beating are necessary features of many styles of music, and not just old music. Blind obedience to pitch accuracy ruins strings, prevents Hammond organ Leslie cabinets working properly, and knocks out virtually every 80's synth patch - remember the detune knob that produces all that gorgeous richness. Music theory should be teaching you the benefits of beating and blending, not driving you to pointless and quite wrong conclusions. By the way, if you find a tuning fork from before the digital era, then sticking it on a meter might be a surprise.

As for A=440Hz, or 432, or 444 - there is not one jot of evidence to support any of these being somehow better. Indeed, as for years, record players were +/ many percent it can be argued that it really doesn't matter. Back in the early 70's playing along with records on a guitar was a constant battle with retuning, half a tone low or high was common and nasty sounding - so you retuned to E and a bit! People with perfect pitch (and I'm not going to change calling it that) could detect it but most lived with it reluctantly. Perhaps nails on blackboards for some, but back then, no choice.

Now we can measure accurately, all these crazy notions abound, and newcomers believe them. That's fine, the world is flat too. Belief is different to change, unlike opinions. I now use a guitar tuner, but never used to. I'm now much more pitch consistent than before, but I don't sound different.

Unless you are producing music with sine waves and no harmonics, then this attention to absolute pitch is a waste of much of your life. Why look for a plug-in to detect pitch. Use your ears, not your eyes, and if your ears say it's wrong, fix it, and if they tell you it's wonderful, who cares?

DM60 Sat, 06/27/2015 - 02:59

Hope I am answering to the OP's question. The MIDI notes themselves are not tuned. It is just a standard data set that represents data that maps to a keyboard, nothing more. The tuning change if it is allowed by the VSTi would be to change the pitch of middle C so that all of the notes shift to +4 cents in their tunings. Like tuning your guitar so all of the strings shift to #, but it would be done the the basic Middle C (usually the note that is the base not for the instrument). This would have to be done for every instrument as the instrument (VSTi) carries the sound, not the MIDI data.

If the instrument doesn't have a pitch shifter, you could play your part, sent the analog output to another track, then shift that by +4, should be the same effect, since the instrument you are using is probably at 440.

As far as this whole different tuning, let's just say I am not convinced. But if it inspires you, go for it.

You can tune a piano, but you can't tune a fish (MIDI I mean ;) )