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MXL 770 picking up weird hissing noises?

For some reason when I'm in fruity loops my microphone picks up buzzing sound and hissing noises.

mxl 770 cardioid condenser microphone paired with a Neewer 1-Channel 48V Phantom Power Supply with Adapter, BONUS+XLR 3 Pin Microphone Cable for Any Condenser and

SiYear 3.5mm Mini Jack Stereo to XLR Female Microphone Cable, Unbalanced 1/8 inch to XLR 3 Pin Interconnect Cable Cord Adapter (1.5Feet) to connect to my pc

this is what i have going on
https://gyazo.com/e6abfe421711c6eCD522822afa133088

https://gyazo.com/4f3e1fd1f4ae85f40c7c5037e7d9da65

https://gyazo.com/a18f7bef80daafd2a3b9ecfd01dbe066

https://gyazo.com/323a5b53af48b4a48c616faee2659b12

EXAMPLE:

go to 18 seconds!

Comments

paulears Sun, 01/19/2020 - 10:46

Well - I suspect there are two issues here. The version you have doesn't;t use the 18V power supply, but looks like it is a USB powered device - so it's creating 48V from a 5V power supply, and my guess with your mic is it cannot generate the full voltage, so the mic internal preamp is suffering. You're also going into the computer audio input that's generally a handful of basic components expecting a headset mic for gamers to yell into. They're rarely anything but hissy. You've got a decent mic, but you really need a proper audio interface to give you decent signal to noise. You have got a mismatch between quality levels. A noisy preamp that can't supply phantom power, a nice mic that needs a decent power supply to perform well, and a budget power supply that is struggling to power the mic.

My advice? Scrap the power supply, and invest in a modest interface - lots on the market for beginners with proper 48V phantom.

Boswell Sun, 01/19/2020 - 11:31

The Neewer power unit you mentioned has an external 18V A.C. output wall wart power supply unit. I have one of those, and I know it's quiet in operation. The output is generated by a simple voltage tripler rectifier to get the required d.c. voltage to feed a 48V regulator.

However, as Paul points out, this is not the one shown in your photos, which has a 5V d.c. input via a USB cable. This version uses a d.c. - d.c. converter with its own oscillator, and these configurations are very prone to injecting oscillator noise into the audio. My guess is that is what is happening, not helped by your feeding the microphone signal directly into the computer motherboard.

I would agree with Paul: get an entry-level Audio Interface. The Focusrite Scarlett Solo is a good value unit with a single XLR microphone input and 48V phantom power. We are happy to advise on other good/not so good ones if you come up with a few in your price range.

Joel Mon, 01/20/2020 - 12:58

paulears, post: 463221, member: 47782 wrote: Well - I suspect there are two issues here. The version you have doesn't;t use the 18V power supply, but looks like it is a USB powered device - so it's creating 48V from a 5V power supply, and my guess with your mic is it cannot generate the full voltage, so the mic internal preamp is suffering. You're also going into the computer audio input that's generally a handful of basic components expecting a headset mic for gamers to yell into. They're rarely anything but hissy. You've got a decent mic, but you really need a proper audio interface to give you decent signal to noise. You have got a mismatch between quality levels. A noisy preamp that can't supply phantom power, a nice mic that needs a decent power supply to perform well, and a budget power supply that is struggling to power the mic.

My advice? Scrap the power supply, and invest in a modest interface - lots on the market for beginners with proper 48V phantom.

Boswell, post: 463222, member: 29034 wrote: The Neewer power unit you mentioned has an external 18V A.C. output wall wart power supply unit. I have one of those, and I know it's quiet in operation. The output is generated by a simple voltage tripler rectifier to get the required d.c. voltage to feed a 48V regulator.

However, as Paul points out, this is not the one shown in your photos, which has a 5V d.c. input via a USB cable. This version uses a d.c. - d.c. converter with its own oscillator, and these configurations are very prone to injecting oscillator noise into the audio. My guess is that is what is happening, not helped by your feeding the microphone signal directly into the computer motherboard.

I would agree with Paul: get an entry-level Audio Interface. The Focusrite Scarlett Solo is a good value unit with a single XLR microphone input and 48V phantom power. We are happy to advise on other good/not so good ones if you come up with a few in your price range.

Ok thanks so much! Is the Focusrite Scarlett Solo is a good value unit with a single XLR microphone input and 48V phantom power all I'll need?

pcrecord Mon, 01/20/2020 - 15:52

Joel, post: 463226, member: 51826 wrote: Ok thanks so much! Is the Focusrite Scarlett Solo is a good value unit with a single XLR microphone input and 48V phantom power all I'll need?

I'd say Yes, the scarlett series are very honest and will server you well. Take the time to think if you will ever use more than 1 input at the time and if other features like midi ports to plug a keyboard is something of interest.
Those are things bigger models can offer.. if it's not for you then go for the solo !

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