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Recording (live or studio)

Ldc or sdc for classical vocal (soprano/ mezzo soprano)

Last Christmas I recorded a grand piano+ mezzo soprano+soprano. I used a ldc mic (Austrian audio 818) and a zoom f6 32bit float. Unfortunately it sounded bad. There was a nasty distortion in the higher frequencies at some moments both the vocals came in. The mic did not clip and was put about 3m from the vocals. In fact the on camera mic (sdc stereo mic) was ok and saved the day. In the past I did some nice recording with this mic and a classical tenor.( I tested the mic afterwards and it is fine) Would a Schoeps mk40 or mk41 be a better option?

Alesis MultiMix 4 to a single QSC CP8?

Hi, I have an Alesis MultiMix 4 mixer and a single QSC CP8 speaker. The manual for the mixer says to use 1/4 TRS for the main outs. And the speaker has a female XLR input. So my question is, if I only have one speaker, should I get a dual 1/4" TRS cable that terminates at the other end as a male XLR? Is that the proper connection when I only have one speaker? If not, how should I connect the main outs to the speaker? Thanks!

M5 Matched Pair in X/Y Coincident Configuration: Recording A String Quartet

This demonstration of the Rode M5 sounds pretty good.

I've own this RODE M5 kit and found them to be a great price but a bit metallic sounding. I tried them through a variety of tube pre's which helped soften the sound but still wasn't overly happy with the sound. They are a hell of a deal for the price though.

Its interesting how something sounds ok today when I don't have another option to compare against. I put more focus on the overall performance and simply enjoyed to whole video and the group performing. 

I'm a sucker for string quartets.

Enjoy

Will a microphone with a frequency response of e.g. 50-15000 Hz not capture anything at all above 15k?

Hello! Been a while since last time I posted here.

In all my years of recording I have never bothered to learn what the specified frequency response (FR) of a microphone really means. I have always thought it means that the mic wont capture anything outside of the FR range, but is that really true?

According to Shure the FR "defines the range of sound that a microphone can reproduce and how its output varies within that range". 

Is it like if you'd put a low pass filter with a slope of say 96 dB/octave at 15k?