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minor chords attract teenagers - what else ?

Some great topics happening here.

I've been told that teenagers seem to like songs with minor chords. When I think back, I think I was like that too. Maybe these are the years we start thinking about life more. Minor chords have a mystery to them... yes?

Are there other interesting sounds or progressions that are either age or gender related ?

Comments

IIRs Sat, 02/24/2007 - 03:56
TuBlairy wrote:
Ya, I keep thinking how ‘Bitches Brew’ and 4’33” are so similar! It's cool how you demean someone's broad illustration of musical styles by offering an extremely small selection of music which is all derived from the same roots: folk and liturgical. Is this a new reductionist approach?

You missed my point completely!

Had I gone on to list "all aspects of music" the thread would be 1000 pages long and I still wouldn't have finished!

"if one could adequately render in conceptual language what music expresses directly, one would have an instant and complete explanation of the universe" - Schopenhauer

Cucco Sat, 02/24/2007 - 06:04
IIRs wrote: [quote=TuBlairy]
Ya, I keep thinking how ‘Bitches Brew’ and 4’33” are so similar! It's cool how you demean someone's broad illustration of musical styles by offering an extremely small selection of music which is all derived from the same roots: folk and liturgical. Is this a new reductionist approach?

You missed my point completely!

Had I gone on to list "all aspects of music" the thread would be 1000 pages long and I still wouldn't have finished!

"if one could adequately render in conceptual language what music expresses directly, one would have an instant and complete explanation of the universe" - Schopenhauer
So let me get this right....

I list only a few genres as examples and you suggest I'm being close minded.

You list a few genres as examples and someone suggests you're being closed minded...

Then you defend yourself with the statement that if you listed all genres, you would take up the whole page.......

Hmmm....now, why was it that I only listed a few MAJOR genres again????

I think the point here is....before you jump all over someone for something that trivial, bear in mind that they might have actually been right in the first place.

Pro Audio Guest Tue, 02/06/2007 - 08:26
i agree that those do seem to be certain tendencies. however rythym tempo often gets exagerrated in a sense. for instance many seemingly different time signatures can fit within the context of 4/4 just as the different modes including aeolian (the minor scale) fit within ionian (the major scale). and thus you have techniques such as 'relative minors.' that and people usually tend to over complicate and glorify the use of 'unusual' time signatures. modal scales as well.

no doubt that using truly diverse time signatures at times can be interesting, but doing it just for the sake of trying to be complex can often get ridiculous and/or unmusical. this and the modal scales are paradoxical because it can go both ways if you are referring to technicality. technical performance can definently enhance your creative style but it can also be detrimental to it. it seems to me like a lot of people do these things just to get a rise out of someone rather than for the sake of the all holy music.

don't get me wrong, i believe in technical rigour and try to practice it myself as often as possible. but when it is used for compensation of an absence in creativity, it gets old.

Pro Audio Guest Sat, 02/24/2007 - 06:51
Ok, so all this talk of "theory" but you are all speaking in the "classical" sense. what about the theory behind indian music.
now i may be wrong but i believe they have like 2-3 more notes in their scales,

how can you tell me your 'classical' training is superior? WTFMATE?

I say this to bring up the point of these other "thoerys" out there that are sometimes ignored.
i suspect most people dont know the theory behind a lot of the more worldly musical styles. i certainly dont. anyone care to clarify this Indian style 'theory'?

hueseph Tue, 02/06/2007 - 09:33
Well a lot of band like to superimpose "odd" time signatures into 4over4 time(Meshuggah, Tool). But Zeppelin actually used odd time. Try to play a 4/4 beat over "Four Sticks" (hehe). It ain't gonna happen. The intro to "Over the Hills and Far Away" is one of the most misplayed riffs ever. The timing is just difficult to nail.

One thing that I think has become more and more exploited is the fact that kids like to hear music being done by someone their own age. So, we have acts like Kisha Chante. The girl just turned 17. Granted this girl has some great songwriters backing her but there are numerous others who are just generated from a computer program. (Ah Disney! Is there anything they won't do?)

On the flipside, I think Newagers are big on Major add 9 chords.

Scoobie Sat, 02/24/2007 - 07:26
JoeJoeMan wrote:
For example, generaling speaking now, I know there are exceptions, theory/scale type players don't make good blues players, they tend to play blues scales, their playing seems to lack a repitore of standard blues licks or how to build around them. It's like they memorized the dictionary but they don't know how to put the words together to saying anything meanfull, for the novice blues listener they can be very impressed by these scale type players, with their fingers flying up and down the board,

I call people like this........Musical Masturbator's, they like to play with theirself!

With that said, I do know people that if you put sheet music in front of them. They can play the crap out of their instrument. But put that person with other people and their timing goes to hell.

Peace................Scoobie

moonbaby Tue, 02/06/2007 - 10:20
John Bonham was the king of syncopation, to be sure.And minor keys may indeed, be favored by the "youth", because minor keys tend to reflect a brooding emotional quality. And you have all these kids with their hormones and romantic fantasies running around getting their poor hearts broken.
That's a recipe for a minor-key song right there!
I've noted that it's quite different for contemporary Christian music, which seems to have mostly simple major keys. This tends to come off "pretty" and "happy". Screw 'em, I like unresolved diminisheds!

Pro Audio Guest Tue, 02/06/2007 - 10:30
yeah zeppelin and pink floyd's - money. and i can't heavily comment on the drums, bonham and many other drummers did some really interesting things, a lot of times though it was still in the 4/4 feel which is what made an off timing drum beat sound so much more interesting. i don't find the timing aspects of over the hills all that complicated.

no doubt the mouseketeers or american idol is a pretty BS way to find music, people never cease to amaze me with their ignorance.

i guess by the add 9 chords you are referring to retro acts like the strokes?

Pro Audio Guest Sat, 02/24/2007 - 11:37
scoobie wrote.
I call people like this........Musical Masturbator's, they like to play with theirself!
That's funny, I had a friend call it that too, while we were watching these two bluegrass pickers do their show-off routine.

BUT Getting back to the topic at hand,

I've been told that teenagers seem to like songs with minor chords. When I think back, I think I was like that too. Maybe these are the years we start thinking about life more. Minor chords have a mystery to them... yes?

With all due respect, I'd say you whole thesis is, shall we say misplaced. It's true that they do like minor chords, afterall they do listen to such songs.....but they are certainly more attracted to major chords, as is evident by how many more songs they listen to in major keys, probably by a factor of 10 to 1, ...... so what is it that attracts them largely to major chords I think would be a more pertinent question to ask.
As a side question, we have a tendency and an easy time of it, associating minor keys with sadness, mystery, etc. And we like to think that music expresses an emotion or feeling. Then to put that assumption to a test, I ask........... what mood or emotion would you associate with a major key ?
If there is something in a teenages life that attracts them to minor chords there is something even more deep and profound that attracts them to major chords. Once again, as evident by the overwhelming number of songs written and listened to in major keys.

Pro Audio Guest Tue, 02/06/2007 - 11:24
i have played along with it, many times. the only difficulty in performing the song live is getting the heavier tone right after the acoustic intro. nothing that couldn't be done in a studio anyways. i'm sure page ignores things like that every night he plays. and i can't remember distinctly the attributes of the slide playing (or even if there is any i can't recall), but it might be somewhat challenging. although page's slide playing (ie what is and what should never be) isn't all too difficult.

i'm sorry i don't know what new-agers means, is that the four turtles who fight crime? i know what new wave is, but no luck with the other.

Pro Audio Guest Sat, 02/17/2007 - 18:17
cucuccho Wrote:

Hey JoeJoeMan...

1st, it's not TOO hard to spell my name right. At worst, you could highlight and hit ctrl-c then ctrl-v.

2nd, I stand firm by my statement. The following artists all are "influencial" (arguably the MOST influential of the 20th century) and all of them had music training to some degree.

I didn't want to turn this whole topic around but I was just bringing up a point. Whether somone has formal musical training or not, reguarding their merit wasn't my point, or concern, I was just making a point.
A couple other names that come to mind, I could be wrong but I don't think they studied Bach or Baytuvan
Steve Ray Vaughn
Albert King - grand father of rock/blues guitar
Bob Dylan - (some already mentioned)
Hank Williams
Robert Johnson
Bill Monroe (father of bluegrass)
Jimmy Rogers - father of country music
BB King - chairman of the board
Woody Guthrie
Earl Scruggs - single handed defined bluegrass banjo - ask Bela

Someone help me out....did Louie Armstrong have any formal training ?

And probably the father of rock and roll Chuck Berry, did he have and training ? Obviously he had some, he wrote "Roll Over Beethoven"

Personaly I don't have an opinion one way or the other as far formal music training, whatever.
I do know one thing I coulda' used some more formal training in spelling, right...cucucho or however you say it....

cucucho....."Freddy Mercuri" ? I think his legacey will be more in line with bad fashion (nice pants) and didn't he play with the Cowsills, he did have a nice chest though (did he wax or was that nature?). So I guess I see your point

Davedog Sat, 02/24/2007 - 14:59
In breaking down the structure of a musical thought, one MUST regard the emotional impact of it no matter whether its written or its played on the fly.

There has only been an inkling of discussion here about the emotional impact of key signatures and the relative minor or majorness (a new word??) of these structures.


ALL of the great classical composers approached music from this emotional aspect regardless of their tutoring or accomplishment on their particular instrument.

Great ear trained artists do the same, be it blues, jazz, rock,etc....the genre matters least....

If we are to consider the affect of the modality of the music in an emotional sense, then its purely up to the individual experienceing the music to what effect it may or may not have on them personally.

Its a bit of a stretch to assume that a minor key means the same to all people everywhere. As it is to think that a major triad is all happiness and promise to all people.

Music is a language of the soul and a conduit for expression of the self within.

You can write that down, but at some point you have to go past the written word to express the true emotional content of that self.

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