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Spray painting drum cymbals.

Member for

21 years 2 months
I thought it would nifty to paint my cymbals to match my drumset...

how do you think this would affect the sound and performance of the cymbals?

lol...

Comments

Member for

21 years 2 months

audiokid Tue, 02/27/2007 - 08:14
Actually, about 30 years ago, when Santana used that Yamaha guitar with all that brass... I figured that was how he got all that sustain so I wanted to do that too.

I went to a antique shop and bought a brass kick plate (a brass plate located on old doors to protect shoes from damaging doors). I cut this thing up (like the shape of a work boot) and placed it between my bridge.

To make a long story short, I used NGI stain (non grain raising stain). Its an alcohol based product. You have to sand (lightly scuff) the brass a bit in order for it (anything) to stick. A very fine coating of lacquer to follow. My brass was deep purple and it looked pretty cool at that time.

Member for

17 years 8 months

Cucco Tue, 02/27/2007 - 10:14
Bob -

A lot of your statements are very correct. However, I stress again that it is not merely the column of air which is the key component of the sound. By "sound" I mean, pitch, timbre AND amplitude.

Pitch is determined by the air column as are, to a small degree, timbre and moreso amplitude.

However, the air column CAN exist without the instrument - it's called air-buzzing (buzzing sanz-mouthpiece - I do it as a warm up everyday.)

The air column generated here is the SAME air column as that inside the instrument with the only exception being that *in* the horn, it is bouncing off of (and consequently vibrating) the metal that is the instrument.

It is this relationship which causes timbre and tone and to a degree (depending upon the vibratory properties of that metal) amplitude.

My point at the very beginning of this was that the metal's vibrations are what produce the sound and I stand behind that point. Take away the metal (replace with plastic as you propose) and you merely have the sound of buzzing (I've done it. In fact, we've made "garden hose horns" using a garden hose and a funnel. What you get is the sound of buzzing mouthpieces. It certainly didn't "notch" any specific overtones (some were present, but certainly not strong). We used a section of hose 9' in length approximating a Bb instrument.)

So again, if you look at this as a simple equation:

buzzing(vibration) + air + sympathetic vibrations = desired sound

it all seems to make sense.

However, it's not quite that simple.

Buzzing (vibration) + sympathetic vibrations = close to desired sound (but does not equal no sound)

In other words, the subjective sound of the instrument (the timbre, projection, quality, amplitude) is created by the vibration of the metal.

In a woodwind instrument, this is completely different. The majority of the sound IS in fact created by a perturbed flow of air.

Remember, the whole point here was whether or not the cymbal would be affected by paint and my point was that horns are but not significantly. The fact is, the metal DOES vibrate (significantly at that) and that is what provides the "tone" and "timbre" of the instrument.

I am definitely not debating with you the fact that the air column plays a major role and that it is in fact the catalyst or proximate cause of those vibrations. My only argument is that all three components (initial vibration/buzzing, air column, vibrating metal) bear equal responsibility in the production of sound. (Take ANY of the 3 of those away from the equation or even substitute another variable and you end up equally non-usable sound - thus all are equal)

Bob wrote:
I think it is a very common tendency of musicians to take the basic physics of their instrument for granted and focus on the aspect that determine the fine details.
Quite possibly true, however, I've studied the acoustical physics of my instrument with great fervor.

Cheers -

J.

Member for

21 years 2 months

Pro Audio Guest Thu, 03/01/2007 - 01:25
multoc wrote: you'd be an idiot to do that. the coating that paiste did for joey jordison was not even permanent as spray painting would be. leave your expensive cymbals alone u dumbass cymbals are shiny leave them be

Heres the problem.

First off, I have crappy B8s, and not only are they inexpensive, but they sound awful.

Secondly, they not only sound way to bright, but... god damn it, shiny things scare me!



Right now, i have them tightened SO much to get rid of the extremely ugly shimmer they have. Worst decaying cymbals I've ever heard.

maybe the mass of the paint would stop this a lil bit?

Member for

15 years 7 months

BobRogers Thu, 03/01/2007 - 05:19
A bottle of lacquer thinner is a couple of bucks, so this is an easy thing to undo. (Just be careful when applying lacquer based spray paint or removing spray paint with lacquer thinner. Very toxic. Very flammable.) The one big negative is that the logos are definitely gone, so your resale is way down.

I've tried lots of things to try to tame down bright cymbals - including gaffer tape. Nothing much has worked besides buying better cymbals. But then again, this may be an improvement. M guess is that the most you could lose here is a little time and some of the resale value of the cymbals. It's up to you.

Member for

16 years 9 months

drumist69 Thu, 03/01/2007 - 19:33
Just save some money and buy better cymbals? If price is a factor, the Sabian X20 series is cheap and sound close to Zildjian A's. I got an 18" X20 crash for $80 new when I was on the road and in a bind with a cracked Zildjian A. Sounded similar, quality-wise, but quieter, not as full. Still, not bad for the money. ANDY

Member for

21 years 2 months

Pro Audio Guest Thu, 03/08/2007 - 00:48
Has anyone tried it yet, or am I gunna have to be the first one? Lol.

Who knows, if a thin coat of laquer on a cymbal could produce a more desired sound, then it could open a door to a whole new wave of sounds. coated brass instruments, like trumpets and shizz might end up sounding really cool.

Not to mention, instruments could start looking a lot less typical :)

Member for

16 years 2 months

RemyRAD Thu, 03/08/2007 - 01:27
I think all this discussion about blowing, sucks? Isn't this supposed to be a woman's topic?? What do you guys know?

I wouldn't paint a cymbal. Too thick and messy. Have you ever tried painting your own nails? Of course not...... I hope not?!?!

Maybe, you like the sound of beating on trash can lids? I don't. I like fat sound and thin cymbals. Not fat cymbals and thin sound. Rather, I would think that possibly having the cymbals anodized would be the way to go? The colors are better and it makes the cymbal nonconductive, so you can't get shocked by how bad it sounds.

Trashy smashy
Ms. Remy Ann David

Member for

21 years 2 months

audiokid Fri, 04/03/2015 - 20:56
I wonder is the OP ever followed through with this one. I can't imagine ever painting cymbals and not ending up with cured paint flying all over the place from the vibrations. I don't recall anyone mentioning this

So, enough time has passed where I'm betting this was a cool until the sticks started flying.

Member for

9 years

DonnyThompson Sat, 04/04/2015 - 06:18
Personally, I wouldn't put any material on cymbals. Aesthetics aside, it sounds to me like the perfect recipe for disastrous sonic results... not to mention the potential for shrapnel flying around the stage. ;)

You can buy colored cymbals - and I'm pretty certain that the folks at Zildjian or Paiste aren't using a can of Krylon spray paint to do the job. ;)


Member for

21 years 2 months

audiokid Sat, 04/04/2015 - 08:24
pcrecord, post: 427545, member: 46460 wrote: I think a painting coat is a big mistake, unless its somekind of flexible, it would chip off easily. In any case it would be terrible for the sound.

One thing that might give acceptable results is using somekind of wood stain or chimical treatment.
Good suggestion on that, my thoughts too. but I suspect you'd need to clear coat them to get them to look like a Rat Rod.
Attached files

Member for

21 years 2 months

audiokid Sat, 04/04/2015 - 08:30
DonnyThompson, post: 427549, member: 46114 wrote: Personally, I wouldn't put any material on cymbals. Aesthetics aside, it sounds to me like the perfect recipe for disastrous sonic results... not to mention the potential for shrapnel flying around the stage. ;)

You can buy colored cymbals - and I'm pretty certain that the folks at Zildjian or Paiste aren't using a can of Krylon spray paint to do the job. ;)


Wow, I had no idea you could buy cymbals painted like this. Not my idea of cool though. Stage lighting and brass looks traditionally awesome to me. New fashion I suppose. They look like they would sound wrong in a none sustaining way. Maybe closer to the sound of MP3's but without the "swirly" effect lol.

Love to here back from him and any reviews on these modern painted ones? I wonder what the process is to finish them? Looks like baked enamel. I can see what looks to be brass in the hole. Most likely drilling the hole is the last step of the production process.
Looks like its definitely a coating over brass and not some hybrid composite brass.

Member for

19 years 4 months

Kurt Foster Sat, 04/04/2015 - 09:18
audiokid, post: 427551, member: 1 wrote: Wow, I had no idea you could buy cymbals painted like this. Not my idea of cool though. Stage lighting and brass looks traditionally awesome to me. New fashion I suppose. They look like they would sound wrong in a none sustaining way. Maybe closer to the sound of MP3's but without the "swirly" effect lol.

Love to here back from him and any reviews on these modern painted ones? I wonder what the process is to finish them? Looks like baked enamel. I can see what looks to be brass in the hole. Most likely drilling the hole is the last step of the production process.
Looks like its definitely a coating over brass and not some hybrid composite brass.

looks to me like those are anodized.

on the other hand, i say go ahaead and paint them. i would use that "Flexshield" paint ... the rubber spray sh*t ... you get what you ask for ... (deserve).

Member for

8 years 9 months

pcrecord Sun, 04/05/2015 - 04:30
Kurt Foster, post: 427552, member: 7836 wrote: looks to me like those are anodized.

on the other hand, i say go ahaead and paint them. i would use that "Flexshield" paint ... the rubber spray sh*t ... you get what you ask for ... (deserve).

This would be ideal to kill the cymbal sounds if you want to make a practice kit or trigger kit.

this is what paint results looks like :



I think color matching the drums is quite ugly anyway :

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