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Don't ever buy wireless headphones for music composing

Don't ever buy wireless headphones for music composing.
I wanted to cut the cord and get some headphones that didn't hurt my ears after 15 minutes or so. Also thought it would be nice to jam on some bass to songs without the corded headphones. So I bought these PowerBeats3 wireless headphones. Bad mistake! One word: Latency!

Comments

Boswell Fri, 05/24/2019 - 02:31

Those Dre PowerBeats3 earplugs use a Bluetooth connection. To reduce battery power consumption, they run on the lower spec of the required DSP, resulting in latency being significantly increased over standard analogue cordless headphones. In addition, the frequency response is hyped, making them unusable for mixing or other critical listening.

pcrecord Fri, 05/24/2019 - 04:52

I bought those after seeing them being praised on onbox therapy (for being good for the price). They do not sound good in the upper frequencies but I didn't feel any latency.
Prior to those I had a Wish version of the SAVFY True Wireless Mini Bluetooth which have terrible latency. I can't even look at a video with them specially music videos..

So I guess they are not all equal.
In the end, I wouldn't even try recording with wireless equipment in fear of playing offset of the track. I just bought a ART headphone amp anyway ! ;)

paulears Mon, 08/05/2019 - 03:43

In my band we use IEMs, custom ear moulds and Sennheiser kit, with Shure ears. I'm happy with the sound ....... until one gig I left the batteries at home, and had to use a long 3.5mm cable into the mixer, removing the wireless element. A real change in the audio - my bass sounded much cleaner, and the background noise, often masked during songs, really improved between them. the equipment spec is pretty good, but there really is a defined 'sound' to the RF components. I've got plenty of RF gear mics, mic packs, rack and battery receivers, all Sennheiser and a few Shures, plus Line 6 digital and a single Shure handheld digital. All the digital ones have small amounts of latency but none are bad, and the side benefit is a reduction in feedback. Until it does go, and when that happens, it's sudden and pretty violent. It really works for you in the wedges though. I don't record with any of this gear though - that stays wired and analogue.

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